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GTGC #243 The Discovery

November 22nd, 2017

Welcome back to the GoodTrash GenreCast, a film analysis podcast discussing movies you won't find in a film studies course. And this week, we look at the Netflix original film The Discovery. 

Doing It Like They Do in The Discovery

This week we take off into the great unknown as The Discovery tries to go into the afterlife. Set two years after Thomas Harbor (Redford) discovers the afterlife, a prodigal son named Will (Segel) returns to his family's home. While on route, Will meets Isla (Mara), a troubled drifter. The two are drawn deeper and deeper into Harbor's tests and theories as he tries to uncover just what is on the other side of the veil.

With the fourth week of Netflix November in the bag, we sit back and ponder some of the issues plaguing all of these films. The Discovery also has us talking Karl Marx and religion. We also discuss suicide and if the film's conceit is plausible enough for us.

But before we get down to that particular brand of film analysis, we share our quick thoughts on the film as a whole. We also play a game. This week, we explore some of our favorite existential films and have a moment of reflection for ourselves.

With only one week of Netflix November left, we start to wonder if any movie can emerge as a true discovery of delight.

Until then, we saw something on the other side, care to join in to see for yourselves?

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Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #242 What Happened to Monday

November 18th, 2017

Hello, as your favorite film analysis podcast keeps streaming through Netflix November, we take a look at the dystopian sci-fi picture, What Happened to Monday.

What Happened to Monday?

As Netflix November rolls forward, we decide to get into some more action with the dystopian sci-fi action thriller What Happened to Monday? It's something of a whoddunit, but not quite. In a world where procreation has been limited to one child per family, a group of septuplets are born. The grandfather (Defoe) of the septuplets opts to hide them away to keep them safe. The seven sisters are named for the days of the week, and as they grow up they share a common alias that allows them outside on the day corresponding with their name. Then, Monday goes missing. The other sisters rally together to figure out What Happened to Monday. 

This film is something else, to say the least.

We give quick reviews and a lot of quips as we start the show, and then we move into our game. This week, we discuss our favorite Actors Who Played Multiple Parts in the Same Film. The title is clunky, but we have a lot of fun discussing some of our faves. Then, as always, we get down to business. We try to make some sense of this convoluted film. We discuss the regressive nature of the ideology. The social idea of all being punished for the actions of one. Identity is also a point of discussion as well.

Now, help us uncover what happened to Tuesday–Sunday.

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Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #241 Wheelman

November 11th, 2017

Hurry up! Your favorite film analysis podcast is in deep with the wrong people. We need someone to listen to our analysis of Wheelman!

Shut Up and Drive, Wheelman

Netflix November enters its second week fast and furious. Not that fast, or that furious, but it's high octane nonetheless as we look at the Frank Grillo vehicle, Wheelman. Director Jeremy Rush's Wheelman is 80-minutes of non-stop driving—literally. 98% of the movie takes place from the passenger seat of a Beamer with a red trunk. Grillo is the Wheelman, we never get a name, who agrees to drive for a bank heist. With the heist in progress, Wheelman gets a call from an unknown number, which completely changes the direction of the night.

We may have come across a common theme for the Netflix originals, but being only two weeks in, we're going to wait to pass judgement. We discuss our quick takeaways about what works and doesn't work within the film early in the show. And then, we play our weekly game. This week, as Grillo is somewhat of an unsung hero in movies, we discuss our Top 3 Unsung Heroes of the Silver Screen.

We also get down to business. Much like the Wheelman, we got a long way to go, and a short time to get there. This week, we discuss the role of the daughter and trope subversion. We also talk about spectator psychology. It's a thin film, but we do our best to leave you with something.

Oh man, we just got the call. Are you in?

GET IN TOUCH

Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

GTGC #240 Gerald’s Game

November 3rd, 2017

Welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast! On this week's GenreCast, we thought we'd get a little freaky with Gerald's Game.

We're Bound to Play Gerald's Game

We have officially moved out of Shocktober. But, we keep things a bit spooky with an adaptation of Stephen King's work as we move into our new marathon, Netflix November. All month long, we will be looking at Netflix-produced or distributed movies. We thought it would be fitting to kick off the month with another Mike Flanagan film.

Many wondered if Gerald's Game would work as a film—primarily because the novel relies so heavily on inner dialogue to drive the events. Flanagan's task was a bit tricky. You see, Gerald's Game is the story of a husband (Bruce Greenwood) and wife (Carla Gugino) who go to the lake house for a romantic weekend. While there, Gerald decides to add some spice to the bedroom through the use of handcuffs. Jessie is interested at first, but as the game gets underway, she decides she'd prefer not to use the handcuffs. After a bit of a spat, Gerald suffers a heart attack. Jessie is left handcuffed to the bed in a cabin by the lake.

It is a brilliant set up to a story. It's 127 Hours meets 50 Shades of Grey—well, not entirely.

This week, we change our ultimate decision. If you have Netflix, Gerald's Game is already on your virtual shelf. So instead, we decide wether it is worth watching, or if it should be skipped. We also play our game. Somehow, in all of this time, we have never discussed our favorite adaptations. So, that's what we discuss. We also do some analysis. It is a heavy movie at points, and we do our best to navigate those waters. We also discuss ideas related to casting, and its impact on the narrative. We also talk about the film's stance on bondage.

GET IN TOUCH

Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Like our page on Facebook.
Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

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