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GTGC #267 The Village

May 25th, 2018

Welcome back to the GoodTrash GenreCast! This week, your favorite film analysis podcast finally discusses of one today's most intriguing directors, M. Night Shyamalan. That's right, we go full boar into spooky scares and twisting turns as we discuss The Village. Also, Dalton returned from the outside just in time. And, he brought friend-of-the-show Nick Sanford with him!

Wandering The Village

In the early 2000s, M. Night, as Nick points out, was THE director to watch. He had massive critical and financial success with Sixth SenseUnbreakable and Signs. But, The Village marks a turning point. The story takes place in a remote village... Sorry. Ruled by a small council led by Edward Walker (William Hurt), the residents live as many small, rural communities would in the 19th-century. After the loss of a small child, Lucius (Joaquin Phoenix) decides to venture through the forbidden woods into the outside towns to find medicine. The council are worried about the processes of their world being thrown off by outsiders. Couple this with an imminent fear of forrest dwellers, and you've got the makings of a taut thriller.

We get into the the film and talk about its re-evaluation after 14 years. Our game consists of us naming our Top 3 Divisive Films. Finally, we purge The Village of its contents. Nick talks at length about the production history of the film. We look into the formalist approach Shymalan brings to the film. The question of the films politics and its engagement with the Bush Administration and 9/11 also rises to the front of our discussion. Briefly, we discuss the film's portrayal of a certain character with intellectual disabilities.

Oh no! We've spotted the bad color! Time to go!

 

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of The Village! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes or Stitcher after you finish subscribing.

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Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #266 Carrie

May 18th, 2018

Welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast! It's prom season, which means it is time for limos, gowns and bloodbaths! That's right, we get back into our normal, non-singing routine with the original Brian De Palma classic, Carrie. Dalton didn't get asked to the prom, so Alexandra Bohannon came by the studio to count the king and queen ballots for us.

Dancing with Carrie

The 1976 adaptation of Carrie set a lot of precedence. Namely, it kickstarted Hollywood adapting Stephen King's work. The book had only been published a few years prior, and it would become only the first in a long line of the author's titles that would get picked up for screen. Carrie White (Sissy Spacek) is a shy, meek high school student. Her mother, Margaret (Piper Laurie) is a fire and brimstone Christian who assumes the worst in all situations. Guilt-driven abuse fills the White household. One day, during gym, Carrie starts her first period. But, she has no clue about what it means. The other girls begin making fun of her. Carrie realizes that her journey into womanhood not only brings bodily changes, but it unlocks new abilities she didn't know she had—telekinesis.

Knowing how much of an influence Hitchcock was on De Palma, we shape our game around Directors Who Have/Would Influence Us as Filmmakers. It's a mouthful.

After the game, we get down to business to analyze Carrie. In this episode, we discuss the male gaze and the presentation of women. We question if Carrie is a strong female character, or if the movie undercuts that motif. The idea of religion, guilt and sex is brought up. And, we wrap up with a discussion of De Palma's unique style.

Oh, it's time for the king and queen dance, we'll see you next week!

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of Carrie! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #265 Baby Driver

May 8th, 2018

The fat lady is about to sing as we come to a close on our Musical Revue. We wrap up our musical marathon with a look at the 2017 action-heist film, Baby Driver. Wait, is Baby Driver a musical? You'll find out in this week's show. Also, we're joined by a very special guest host, Alexandra Bohannon—who has been doing some work on The Cinematic Schematic.

Ride Along with Baby Driver

With a killer soundtrack and kinetic energy, Baby Driver is at times everything you'd expect from Edgar Wright, while also being a bit different—at least on the surface. Baby (Ansel Elgort) is a getaway driver. And, he's very good. It's what landed him under the thumb of Doc (Kevin Spacey), who is something of a local crime lord. Doc uses Baby for all of his jobs while switching out the crew—namely a rotation of Buddy (Hamm), Bats (Foxx) and Darling (Eiza González). Baby soon learns that eventually, blood will be on his hands.

So, is Baby Driver a musical? This is the big question we tackle this week. We also discuss ragtag families, formalism and Edgar Wright's overarching thematic touchstones.

But, that's not all. After our reviews, we drop our Top 3 Killer Tracks. It seemed fitting.

Now, hit the gas and press play!

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of Baby Driver! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #264 Les Miserables (2012)

May 1st, 2018

Your favorite film analysis podcast returns with one more entry into the GoodTrash Musical Revue with a look at the Tom Hooper adaptation of the beloved classic, Les Misérables (2012). Can you hear the people podcast? Find out in this week's show.

Look Down upon Les Misérables

Based upon the classic novel of the same name, Les Misérables tells the multi-decade tale of reformed prisoner Jean Valjean (Jackman). The stage is set early for the conflict between Valjean and Police Inspector Javert (Crowe). Valjean makes parole, and after struggling on the streets he makes a decision that will send him back to prison, until a gracious priest steps in to show mercy. Valjean swears to do good in the world, and his life takes a turn. In doing so, he crosses paths with Fantine (Hathaway). Discovering Fantine's struggles, Valjean swears to raise her daughter Cosette. There's a lot more to this plot, including an appearance by the ever-annoying Eddie Redmayne—we really dive in to our dislike of Redmayne.

You'll find out more about Redmayne in our quick reviews. But then, we recap the marathon up to this point with a discussion of our Favorite Musical Numbers from the GoodTrash Musical Revue. Finally, we get down into analysis. We talk formalism, grace, mercy and law, and much more on this week's show.

Now, I've dreamt a dream about podcasts gone by...

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us this week for our Les Misérables movie review and analysis! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #263 Across The Universe

April 24th, 2018

The GoodTrash GenreCast, your favorite film analysis podcast, jumps ahead to the aughts as the Musical Revue goes Across the Universe.

Across the Universe focuses on Jude and Lucy, two star-crossed lovers whose lives intertwine through an alternate-60s reality. Jude is from Liverpool. Lucy is from the states. On a quest to find his father, Jude meets Max at Princeton. They strike up a friendship, and Jude meet's Lucy, Max's sister. The two try to define themselves and their relationship against a backdrop of The Beatles' greatest hits and deep cuts.

In our Across the Universe review, we give our brief thoughts. We then play our game—Bands Who Deserve a Musical. Finally, we get down into our Across the Universe analysis. In getting to the meat of the story, we talk art and politics, music, presentation of history and much more.

Goo Goo G'joob, dear listener!

Traveling Across the Universe

Thanks for joining us this week for our Across the Universe movie review and analysis! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #262 Hairspray (1988)

April 13th, 2018

Your favorite film analysis podcast moves along slightly in the '80s as the Musical Revue continues with a look at Hairspray (1988). John Waters' cult classic is unabashedly campy and bizarre, but does it hold up to the test of time?

As we continue along this musical journey, Hairspray is a bit of an odd departure. The original 1988 film is less a musical and more of a dance film. There are still musical numbers, but they're filled with dance, rather than singing. So, it's a bit off the rails in that regard. But, we still had a good conversation around it.

Brushing Out Hairspray

John Waters moved away from his transgressive roots with Hairspray. Several of his key players still show up, including Divine as Edna Turnblad, Tracy's mother. But, by and large, Hairspray is a much more accessible film, in comparison to his earlier works. Set in the 60s, Tracy loves watching the Corny Collins Show, which is one of those classic shows where a bunch of pretty teens dance for an hour. Tracy is enamored. Tracy, defined in the film as pleasantly plump, doesn't adhere to societies norms or values, and reaches out to take what she believes is hers—with great success. The film includes a plot thread involving segregation, but as we discuss in the show, it's much more than simply, black and white.

On this week's episode, we discuss Cult Directors We Want to Make a Musical. After our standard gameplay and quick reviews, we partner up with Hairspray and hit the dance floor. We talk race, queer film, form and function as we try to dig deep in to the film.

GET IN TOUCH

Thanks for joining us this week! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #261 Little Shop of Horrors (1986)

April 5th, 2018

The GoodTrash Musical Revue continues this week as we move forward to the 80s with the Frank Oz cult classic, Little Shop of Horrors.

We thought long and hard about what musicals to add to this Revue. We're going to limit our options somewhat by sticking to the 80s through today, trying to hit a bit from the 80s, 2000s and 2010s. We're going to do some more camp, some traditional Broadway content and a recent, not-so-traditional film that's been classified as a musical. So, we hope you're excited as we finally get lyrical on the GenreCast.

In the Weeds with Little Shop of Horrors

In a post-Jesus Christ Superstar GenreCast, we tried to nail down exactly what we wanted. Little Shop of Horrors just makes sense. It has the cult appeal, the nostalgia, and it's a horror/sci-fi genre piece.

It is the story of Seymour (Rick Moranis), a botanist/shop apprentice who discovers a interesting plant on the day of a solar eclipse. Seymour soon discovers that the plant, Audrey II, could be his ticket out of Skid Row. His goal, make money and woo the assistant florist, Audrey (Ellen Greene), away from her Abusive Boyfriend, DDS (Steve Martin). However, Audrey II soon reveals a master plan of its own.

On this week's show, we offer our quick Little Shop of Horrors review, and then play a game. This week, we talk Movies That Deserve the Musical Treatment. Finally, we get into analysis. We talk Freud, satire, race, misogyny, adaptation and more as we dig into the soil surrounding Little Shop of Horrors. 

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GoodTrash Praisedown Presents: Jesus Christ Superstar

March 29th, 2018

What is this a crossover episode? Indeed it is! The sweet boys from The Praisedown, Heath Huffman and Alex Sanchez, join the GenreCast to discuss the 1973 musical Jesus Christ Superstar. 

As we near Easter Sunday, we thought what better way to celebrate than to join forces with GTM's resident CCM aficionados. A good time is had as the Mega Powers unite to bring you a podcast of Biblically-epic proportions.

Gettin' Down with Jesus Christ Superstar

We have recently been discussing ways to cross promote our shows, as well potential future projects, and somehow we landed on the idea of an Easter Crossover episode. It just made sense. So, we all got together and made it happen. We recorded this episode immediately after we all sat down to watch Jesus Christ Superstar. It was a first-time watch for everyone except Dustin.

Jesus Christ Superstar tells the story of Passion Week over some psychedelic 70s rock. Focusing on the relationship between Christ and Judas, the film brings many pertinent questions about the narrative to light, while also framing within a surreal context that allows it to touch on 1970s' current events.

We kick the show off as we always do with our quick reviews. We nix the game this week so Heath and Alex can deliver their Tune Talk segment. They discuss how the music is constructed within the film and how it affects the narrative. We then move into film analysis to talk formalism, theology and more about the music.

It's a good time.

Well, look's like the stone is rolling away. We'll see you next week!

 

GET IN TOUCH

Thanks for joining us this week! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Follow The Praisedown on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review the Praisedown on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #259 Willy Wonka and The Chocolate Factory

March 23rd, 2018

Welcome to another edition of your favorite film analysis podcast, the GoodTrash GenreCast. On this week's episode, we take a look at the world's longest commercial, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. In a surprising turn of events, Dustin somehow never watched Willy Wonka in his youth. Does the film hit the sweet spot? Or, will this much candy give us a stomach ache?

A Tour of Willy Wonka's Chocolate Factory

The cult classic, Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, is a black comedy for the ages. Directed by Mel Stuart, this fantasy/musical sees Charlie Bucket, and four others, win golden tickets. These special tickets grant them the privilege of visiting the mysterious Wonka chocolate factory. Once inside, the children and their guests soon learn Willy Wonka is much more than simply eccentric.

We're making an effort here at GoodTrash to diversify, not only in the directors that we choose, but also the age of the films we choose. We admit we like to get stuck in the 90s and 2000s, so we're going to try and reach farther back occasionally. On this week's show, we Recast Willy Wonka in an effort to erase the Johnny Depp debacle. We then movie into our analysis of Willy Wonka. We talk racism, colonialism, capitalism and many more -isms.

So, grab your everlasting gobstoppers, and dive in to the chocolate river with us!

 

GET IN TOUCH

Thanks for joining us this week! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #258 Bloodsport

March 17th, 2018

Hello and welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast, the GenreCast from GoodTrash Media. We're back to the trashy basics with a look at the 1988 Cannon production of Bloodsport. The film marks Jean-Claude Van Damme's first starring turn. Is it lovable campy fun? Or should it have met its fate in the kumite.

Battling Bloodsport

1988's Bloodsport tells the story of Frank Dux (pronounced Dukes). Frank (JCVD) is a special ops agent who goes AWOL to battle in a mysterious tournament known as the kumite. While on the lam, Frank meets a journalist trying to get the real story on the kumite, befriends a loveable ogre of a man and stares down a monster of a competitor named Chong Li, who isn't afraid to kill for the win. The best part? All of this is based on a true story.

On this week's show, we rundown our Favorite Cinematic Sports Tournaments. We then get down to business. As we analyze Bloodsport, we discuss racism, the Great White Hero, separating fact from fiction and more in an effort to cut deep into the cult classic.

Are you ready for some action?

 

GET IN TOUCH

Thanks for joining us this week! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you're interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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