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GTGC #274 Dirty Dancing

July 15th, 2018

Our lives keep changing as the summer progresses. That's right, our Growing up in Summer marathon continues this week with the 80s classic, Dirty Dancing—which takes place in the summer of '63. Dirty Dancing offers quite a few differences to Stand by Me. It's never as nostalgic, it features a strong female lead who comes from money. While class is a part of Stand by Me, it drives the narrative of Dirty Dancing.

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GTGC #273 Stand By Me

July 7th, 2018

We move deep in to summer and kick of a new marathon as we discuss one of our favorite genres, the coming-of-age story. Over the next few weeks, we'll look at films narratively set in different decades to see how the genre has evolved. We're kicking things off with the beloved classic from Rob Reiner, Stand by Me. 

Won't You Stand by Me

We kick off this new marathon by delving into the quintessential coming-of-age film. It's not the first, and it may not be the best, but it is probably the most widely known. In many ways, it has defined the genre since its release. The story, based on the Stephen King's novella The Body, sees four boys take off on a journey to see a dead body. Set in the last summer of the 1950s, Stand by Me contains many of the trademark beats of a King story and is brought to life by a dynamic group of kids—River Phoenix, Corey Feldman, Wil Wheaton and Jerry O'Connell. With it being a first time watch for Dalton, the question that stands is, "How well does it hold up?"

We talk at length this week about masculinity, Rob Reiner, acts of violence, the genre itself and what makes Stand by Me a landmark. But, before all of that, we play our game. This week, we talk about our favorite Stephen King adaptations. We also give quick reviews and decide if the movie goes on the shelf or in the trash.

Sounds like the trains a comin', let's get off these tracks.

 

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of the Stand by Me! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes or Stitcher after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.
Listen on Stitcher Internet Radio.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #272 The Italian Job (2003)

June 30th, 2018

Ciao, and welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast! We're back with one more show, much to Dustin's chagrin. Coming out of The Lovelesswe were still in the mood for some bad boys. So, we thought nothing seemed more GoodTrash appropriate than F. Gary Gray's 2003 remake of The Italian Job. 

Zero to Sixty with The Italian Job

We thought, what could be better than Marky Mark, Jason Statham, Mos Def and Charlize Theron pulling a heist in Mini Coopers? Well, almost anything, apparently. The 2003 remake sees Wahlberg's Charlie Croker assembling a crew to get back at a friend turned foe. It's pretty much every heist movie you've seen before.

Our game this week is a good time as we Assemble a Heist Crew from different actors, characters and *checks notes* communist leaders?

We also break this film open in analysis. We talk about the heist film as a genre, the tropes that it entails and it's history. Dustin questions the film masquerading as a Robin Hood type narrative, when the rich are just stealing to get rich. The problematic characters are also a point of discussion. So, despite the film's failures, we still found plenty to talk about.

Now hop in, we got a train to catch!

 

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of the The Italian Job! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes or Stitcher after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.
Listen on Stitcher Internet Radio.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #271 The Loveless

June 23rd, 2018

Welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast, the GoodTrash GenreCast. On this week's episode, we travel back to the 80s to talk motorcycles and leather jackets. Our focus this week? Kathryn Bigelow's directorial debut, The Loveless. In addition, it is also Willem Defoe's feature debut, as well.

Riding with The Loveles

The Loveless is co-written and co-directed by Bigelow and Monty Montgomery. It's the story of a biker gang, led by Defoe, who ride into a small town. The locals aren't too fond of these leather-clad miscreants and tense up, hoping they won't cause trouble. What ensues is an existential study on outsiders, masculinity and classicism in the 50s.

We were a bit taken aback by our thoughts on The Loveless. It wasn't quite what we expected, but we were quite intrigued. In this episode, we play our weekly game; this week, Cinema's Best Bad Boys. Afterwards, we pull into analysis. We try to frame this debut into the rest of Bigelow's filmography. We also discuss the theme's that are rampant in the film, and some of her other works. After all of that, we make the final verdict—shelf or trash.

So grab your chaps, it's time to ride off with The Loveless. 

 

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of the The Loveless! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes or Stitcher after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.
Listen on Stitcher Internet Radio.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #270 Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man Trilogy, Part 2

June 15th, 2018

Welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast! This week, we wrap up our discussion of Sam Raimi's Spider-Man Trilogy. That's right, the wall crawler is back, and we're going to do our best to find out if he's friend or foe!

Upside Down with Spider-Man

Our mega 2-parter on the Spider-Man trilogy concludes this week with a sweet 60 minutes of pure analysis.

In this week's show, we dive deep into the trilogy. Deep dives into auteurism and Raimi's relationship with Sony occur. We also discuss the portrayal of females and how masculinity is represented throughout the franchise. Dustin moves us into the politics of Raimi's Spider-Man and puts it into perspective against the events of 9/11. All of that and more on this week's show.

After that, we of course decide whether it is shelf or trash, and then we make recommendations to go along with it.

If you're a fan of the franchise, hit us up on social media and tell us where we went write and where we went wrong!

Oh no, our GoodTrash-sense is tingling!

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of the Spider-Man Trilogy! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes or Stitcher after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.
Listen on Stitcher Internet Radio.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC Bonus Show: Hereditary (2018) with the Frightful Femme

June 12th, 2018

HEREDITARY SPOILERS IN THIS EPISODE

Hello dear listener!

Your favorite film analysis podcast is back with a raw recording of our thoughts over the new A24 production, Hereditary!

The boys got together and went to the movies, and they were joined by GoodTrash's very own Frightful Femme, Kirsten Therkelson! On this episode, we got in the car right after the movie to record our hottest of hot takes. Does Hereditary live up to the hype? Is Toni Collette really that good? And will we ever be able to sleep again? You'll find all of that information and more in this bonus show.

We tried to hold off on spoilers, but after about 10 minutes, Dustin let it all hang out. So, there are some heavy spoilers ahead. 

Did you see Hereditary? Hit us up on Twitter (@Good_Trash) to let us know your thoughts! 

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GTGC # 269 -Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man Trilogy, Part 1

June 8th, 2018

You read that title correct, dear listener. For the first time ever, we've got a two-parter on our hands! It seemed fitting that tackling a multipart franchise should lead to multiple episodes. So, buckle in for the first half of our discussion of Sam Raimi's Spider-Man. 

Radio-Broadcast Spider-Man 

This episode breaking down into two parts was completely unintentional. But, it's a fun turn of events. Sam Raimi's Spider-Man trilogy had a major impact in the early aughts. The tale of Peter Parker hit cinemas in 2002 and, along with Blade and X-Men, showed that there was a market for comic book adaptations. Now, 16 years and dozens of Marvel and DC adaptations later, how does Raimi's work hold up? That's what we seek to uncover.

The trilogy starts off with Spidey's origin, which is probably second or third in the most-known origins, behind Bats and Superman. After being bitten by a radioactive spider, Peter Parker develops powers similar to a spider. Over the course of three films, he does battle with a variety of tragic and petty villains while also dealing with his own ego, identity and life balance. And through it all, he must realize that, "With great power, comes great responsibility."

On part one of this shindig, we give our reviews of the trilogy and where it sits with us in 2018. We try to give all three parts a fair shake, with a pretty decisive winner. We also attempt to redeem part three, due mostly to all of the dancing! Then, we play our game wherein we highlight our favorite moments from the trilogy.

And after we play our game, well.. Find out on this week's show.

 

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of the Spider-Man Trilogy! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes or Stitcher after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.
Listen on Stitcher Internet Radio.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #268 Prince of Darkness

June 1st, 2018

Welcome back one and all to your favorite film analysis podcast! We gather around the candles and pentagrams this week to discuss a Patreon-awarded show, John Carpenter's Prince of Darkness. That's right, the modern master of suspense makes his way back to the GenreCast analysis table for the sixth time—this time it's thanks to Brigham Cole, so thanks Brigham!

Dining with the Prince of Darkness

John Carpenter's cult classic is the second part of the Apocalypse Trilogy, which begins with The Thing and ends with In the Mouth of Madness. While not narratively connected, the films share a thematic thread. Prince of Darkness tells the story of a group of research students and a priest (Donald Pleasance) who discover a container of glowing green evil in an abandoned church. The evil goo soon begins to infect the troupe, and the survivors must figure out how to win the day, or welcome the end of the world.

After we quickly review the film, we talk about our Favorite Film Trilogies—this is also a setup for our next episode. We then get down to analysis. On this weeks show, we discuss the film's potential critique on social issues. The topic of studio influence and Carpenter's career comes up.

Oh, it appears Alice Cooper is outside. See you all next week!

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of Prince of Darkness! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes or Stitcher after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.
Listen on Stitcher Internet Radio.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #267 The Village

May 25th, 2018

Welcome back to the GoodTrash GenreCast! This week, your favorite film analysis podcast finally discusses of one today's most intriguing directors, M. Night Shyamalan. That's right, we go full boar into spooky scares and twisting turns as we discuss The Village. Also, Dalton returned from the outside just in time. And, he brought friend-of-the-show Nick Sanford with him!

Wandering The Village

In the early 2000s, M. Night, as Nick points out, was THE director to watch. He had massive critical and financial success with Sixth SenseUnbreakable and Signs. But, The Village marks a turning point. The story takes place in a remote village... Sorry. Ruled by a small council led by Edward Walker (William Hurt), the residents live as many small, rural communities would in the 19th-century. After the loss of a small child, Lucius (Joaquin Phoenix) decides to venture through the forbidden woods into the outside towns to find medicine. The council are worried about the processes of their world being thrown off by outsiders. Couple this with an imminent fear of forrest dwellers, and you've got the makings of a taut thriller.

We get into the the film and talk about its re-evaluation after 14 years. Our game consists of us naming our Top 3 Divisive Films. Finally, we purge The Village of its contents. Nick talks at length about the production history of the film. We look into the formalist approach Shymalan brings to the film. The question of the films politics and its engagement with the Bush Administration and 9/11 also rises to the front of our discussion. Briefly, we discuss the film's portrayal of a certain character with intellectual disabilities.

Oh no! We've spotted the bad color! Time to go!

 

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of The Village! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes or Stitcher after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.
Listen on Stitcher Internet Radio.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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GTGC #266 Carrie

May 18th, 2018

Welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast! It's prom season, which means it is time for limos, gowns and bloodbaths! That's right, we get back into our normal, non-singing routine with the original Brian De Palma classic, Carrie. Dalton didn't get asked to the prom, so Alexandra Bohannon came by the studio to count the king and queen ballots for us.

Dancing with Carrie

The 1976 adaptation of Carrie set a lot of precedence. Namely, it kickstarted Hollywood adapting Stephen King's work. The book had only been published a few years prior, and it would become only the first in a long line of the author's titles that would get picked up for screen. Carrie White (Sissy Spacek) is a shy, meek high school student. Her mother, Margaret (Piper Laurie) is a fire and brimstone Christian who assumes the worst in all situations. Guilt-driven abuse fills the White household. One day, during gym, Carrie starts her first period. But, she has no clue about what it means. The other girls begin making fun of her. Carrie realizes that her journey into womanhood not only brings bodily changes, but it unlocks new abilities she didn't know she had—telekinesis.

Knowing how much of an influence Hitchcock was on De Palma, we shape our game around Directors Who Have/Would Influence Us as Filmmakers. It's a mouthful.

After the game, we get down to business to analyze Carrie. In this episode, we discuss the male gaze and the presentation of women. We question if Carrie is a strong female character, or if the movie undercuts that motif. The idea of religion, guilt and sex is brought up. And, we wrap up with a discussion of De Palma's unique style.

Oh, it's time for the king and queen dance, we'll see you next week!

Get in Touch!

Thanks for joining us for our review and analysis of Carrie! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

Follow Us on Twitter.
Subscribe and Review us on iTunes.

Supporting the GenreCast

If you’re interested in offering financial support for the show, that would be awesome. We use these funds to cover production costs and hosting and domain fees, as well as occasional events and merchandise. Support on Patreon comes with a variety of rewards and additional content, such as physical rewards, bonus shows and fun stuff and even programming opportunities.

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