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GTGC #246 Jurassic Park III

December 16th, 2017

Your favorite film analysis podcast spares no expense as we return to discuss Joe Johnston's Jurassic Park III.

We continue our look at threequels with a look at the abhorred entry in the dino-franchise, Jurassic Park III. Without even intending too, this episode comes right after the debut of the Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom trailer. That movie looks like how we feel about the third (and at one point, final) entry in the franchise. But, we keep our talk of the newer entries to a minimum as we really focus on Part III—which is why we're doing this whole thing to begin with!

Jurassic Park III sees Dr. Alan Grant venture to Isla Sorna, or Site B, at the urging of an eccentric couple looking for the most adventurous of all getaways. Grant is joined by his co-worker/apprentice Billy. But, once they arrive at Isla Sorna, they find out that InGen wasn't the only one with hidden intentions.

Welcome Back to Jurassic Park

On this week's episode, we try as we may to uncover what is really going on with Jurassic Park III. We briefly discuss the mythology of the series while we give our reviews. We also play a game—Film Sequels We'd Want on a Deserted Island. Dalton and Dustin keep trying to turn it into favorite sequels, but we already played that game—so tell 'em to knock it off.

We then move into analysis. On this week's show, we discuss the meta-narrative at play and how Grant's arc reflects real life trends with the franchise and the field of paleontology. We also discuss some aspects of the film's ideology at play. We also hone in on Grant's character, and where he stands as a scientist at the end of the film.

We then render a verdict about Jurassic Park III. We spare no expense with that either.

Oh no, it looks like we've lost power. I wonder what that Nedry is up to this time. Oh well, while we figure it out, check out this episode and we'll see you next week—Baybay!

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Thanks for joining us this week! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #245 Back to the Future Part III

December 12th, 2017

We definitely don't need roads this week as your favorite film analysis podcast discusses Back to the Future Part III.

We Go Back to the Future, Sorta

With Netflix November behind us, we decide to end the year with a highly specific marathon—Lesser Part IIIs, Chapter 1.

Yeah, it's a bit ridiculous. But, that's who we are.

We kick the marathon off with the third part of Robert Zemeckis' beloved franchise, Back to the Future from 1990. That's right, Marty, Doc and the DeLorean are all here for the fun as we go back to the wild, wild west. No, not that wild, wild west, thankfully.

The goal of this marathon is to see whether these lesser threequels deserve the disdain they've gained, or if they should get a fair shake.

Part 3 of Back to the Future has us wrapping up Marty's adventures in time as he travels to the old west to save Doc. However, this chapter of the series becomes more focused on Doc as we try to get an understanding of the man behind the machines.

For the most part, all of the hosts came away from Part 3 with a better experience than they had predicted. But, this isn't about the review, it is about the discussion. We discuss the movie as a meta narrative and its dialogue with other films. We also try to digest the time travel logistics the Back to the Future franchise utilizes. We also discuss auteurism and Robert Zemeckis' MO in filmmaking.

Also, we play our game. This week, we talk about movies that should get a western sequel. It's fun. And finally, we grapple with the question—shelf or trash?

Looks like the train is on time, all aboard!

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Thanks for joining us this week! If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #244 Okja

December 1st, 2017

Hello GoodTrashers! Your favorite film analysis podcast is back to finish our Netflix November (December?) marathon with the critically lauded Okja. 

Okja — Giant Pig in the City

The GoodTrash GenreCast wraps up out Netflix November marathon with the much loved Okja. A story of a girl and her giant mutant pig-hybrid. From director Bong Joon-Ho (Snowpiercer), our story follows Mija as she goes on an adventure against her grandfather's wish to rescue the fantastic Okja—a hybrid bred to meet growing food source needs. Mija teams with a group of resistance fighters led by Jay (Paul Dano) and take on the Mirando Corporation led by Lucy (Tilda Swinton).

This Netflix original made waves, and stirred controversy, earlier this year when it made its premier at Cannes. A large dialogue on theater distribution opened up and is still being wrestled with, and will continue to be wrestled with for the time being. As we gathered around to finish the marathon, we decided this was one of Netflix's better cinematic efforts.

We also discussed the themes at work in the film, such as factory farming, consumerism, eating meat and capitalism. We also ranked the Netflix originals to pretty similar results. After all of that discussion, we made a final verdict. Is Okja worth your time? Or is it excess fat to be cut off your 2017 catch up.

Dinner is almost served, so join in and let us know your thoughts on Okja. 

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Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #243 The Discovery

November 22nd, 2017

Welcome back to the GoodTrash GenreCast, a film analysis podcast discussing movies you won't find in a film studies course. And this week, we look at the Netflix original film The Discovery. 

Doing It Like They Do in The Discovery

This week we take off into the great unknown as The Discovery tries to go into the afterlife. Set two years after Thomas Harbor (Redford) discovers the afterlife, a prodigal son named Will (Segel) returns to his family's home. While on route, Will meets Isla (Mara), a troubled drifter. The two are drawn deeper and deeper into Harbor's tests and theories as he tries to uncover just what is on the other side of the veil.

With the fourth week of Netflix November in the bag, we sit back and ponder some of the issues plaguing all of these films. The Discovery also has us talking Karl Marx and religion. We also discuss suicide and if the film's conceit is plausible enough for us.

But before we get down to that particular brand of film analysis, we share our quick thoughts on the film as a whole. We also play a game. This week, we explore some of our favorite existential films and have a moment of reflection for ourselves.

With only one week of Netflix November left, we start to wonder if any movie can emerge as a true discovery of delight.

Until then, we saw something on the other side, care to join in to see for yourselves?

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Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #242 What Happened to Monday

November 18th, 2017

Hello, as your favorite film analysis podcast keeps streaming through Netflix November, we take a look at the dystopian sci-fi picture, What Happened to Monday.

What Happened to Monday?

As Netflix November rolls forward, we decide to get into some more action with the dystopian sci-fi action thriller What Happened to Monday? It's something of a whoddunit, but not quite. In a world where procreation has been limited to one child per family, a group of septuplets are born. The grandfather (Defoe) of the septuplets opts to hide them away to keep them safe. The seven sisters are named for the days of the week, and as they grow up they share a common alias that allows them outside on the day corresponding with their name. Then, Monday goes missing. The other sisters rally together to figure out What Happened to Monday. 

This film is something else, to say the least.

We give quick reviews and a lot of quips as we start the show, and then we move into our game. This week, we discuss our favorite Actors Who Played Multiple Parts in the Same Film. The title is clunky, but we have a lot of fun discussing some of our faves. Then, as always, we get down to business. We try to make some sense of this convoluted film. We discuss the regressive nature of the ideology. The social idea of all being punished for the actions of one. Identity is also a point of discussion as well.

Now, help us uncover what happened to Tuesday–Sunday.

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Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #241 Wheelman

November 11th, 2017

Hurry up! Your favorite film analysis podcast is in deep with the wrong people. We need someone to listen to our analysis of Wheelman!

Shut Up and Drive, Wheelman

Netflix November enters its second week fast and furious. Not that fast, or that furious, but it's high octane nonetheless as we look at the Frank Grillo vehicle, Wheelman. Director Jeremy Rush's Wheelman is 80-minutes of non-stop driving—literally. 98% of the movie takes place from the passenger seat of a Beamer with a red trunk. Grillo is the Wheelman, we never get a name, who agrees to drive for a bank heist. With the heist in progress, Wheelman gets a call from an unknown number, which completely changes the direction of the night.

We may have come across a common theme for the Netflix originals, but being only two weeks in, we're going to wait to pass judgement. We discuss our quick takeaways about what works and doesn't work within the film early in the show. And then, we play our weekly game. This week, as Grillo is somewhat of an unsung hero in movies, we discuss our Top 3 Unsung Heroes of the Silver Screen.

We also get down to business. Much like the Wheelman, we got a long way to go, and a short time to get there. This week, we discuss the role of the daughter and trope subversion. We also talk about spectator psychology. It's a thin film, but we do our best to leave you with something.

Oh man, we just got the call. Are you in?

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Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #240 Gerald’s Game

November 3rd, 2017

Welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast! On this week's GenreCast, we thought we'd get a little freaky with Gerald's Game.

We're Bound to Play Gerald's Game

We have officially moved out of Shocktober. But, we keep things a bit spooky with an adaptation of Stephen King's work as we move into our new marathon, Netflix November. All month long, we will be looking at Netflix-produced or distributed movies. We thought it would be fitting to kick off the month with another Mike Flanagan film.

Many wondered if Gerald's Game would work as a film—primarily because the novel relies so heavily on inner dialogue to drive the events. Flanagan's task was a bit tricky. You see, Gerald's Game is the story of a husband (Bruce Greenwood) and wife (Carla Gugino) who go to the lake house for a romantic weekend. While there, Gerald decides to add some spice to the bedroom through the use of handcuffs. Jessie is interested at first, but as the game gets underway, she decides she'd prefer not to use the handcuffs. After a bit of a spat, Gerald suffers a heart attack. Jessie is left handcuffed to the bed in a cabin by the lake.

It is a brilliant set up to a story. It's 127 Hours meets 50 Shades of Grey—well, not entirely.

This week, we change our ultimate decision. If you have Netflix, Gerald's Game is already on your virtual shelf. So instead, we decide wether it is worth watching, or if it should be skipped. We also play our game. Somehow, in all of this time, we have never discussed our favorite adaptations. So, that's what we discuss. We also do some analysis. It is a heavy movie at points, and we do our best to navigate those waters. We also discuss ideas related to casting, and its impact on the narrative. We also talk about the film's stance on bondage.

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Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don’t like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #239 Hush

October 27th, 2017

The Shocktober train pulls into the station as your favorite film analysis podcast wraps up the annual horror marathon with Hush.

A Hush Fell Over the Room

As we ended one marathon, we wanted to transition softly into our next marathon. We will be screening Netflix Originals throughout November.  So, we opted for the Netflix-distributed Hush from Mike Flanagan. Maddie is an author, who has decided to live on her own in the countryside. One evening, a masked mad man shows up on her doorstep. Upon discovering that Maddie is deaf and mute, a dangerous game of cat and mouse gets underway.

On this week's episode, we try to dig through Flanagan's taut home invasion thriller. We explore the choice of a deaf/mute protagonist, and the ramifications of that from an ideological standpoint. But, we also examine the use of the character from a formalist storytelling perspective—diving into the film's use of sound and staging. We also look at the ideas of toxic masculinity and victimization and how it is explored in Hush.

But before we get into all that, we offer our initial thoughts of the film. We also play our weekly game—Favorite Smart/Strong Horror Protagonists. And ultimately, we will decide if Hush is worthy of going on the shelf, or if it quietly falls into the trash.

Now, go ahead and dive in to this week's episode. You can hear us, can't you?

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Thanks for joining us for another wonderful Shocktober. If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Hit us up and let us know what you like and what you don't like. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #238 Raw

October 18th, 2017

Welcome back to your favorite film analysis podcast, the GenreCast from GoodTrash Media. This week, our Shocktober marathon of one-word titled films continues with a look at the French/Belgium production, Raw. 

It Gets Raw

Every Shocktober sees at least one artsy horror film rear its head. When the time came, we decided to tackle this foreign production that has been making waves since its festival run. Raw, or Grave, is a horror-thriller from director Julia Ducournau. Justine (Marillier) is a vegetarian and first-year student at veterinary school. She must undergo a series of hazing rituals from older students—including her sister, Alexia (Rumpf). Justine is forced to eat meat—after which, the hunger for flesh only grows.

Raw is a tough watch. But, it offers a lot to digest. The film is multilayered. We don't even get to hit everything, to our chagrin. We do talk vegetarianism, sexual awakenings and we carefully tread into discussing eating disorders. However, we wish we could have hit on hazing and bullying in the digital age, general desire and more. Spoiler alert, we may have liked this one quite a bit.

As always, before we get down to analysis, we give quick reviews and play a game. This week, we talk about "Memorable Body Horror Sequences". It felt like a fitting pairing. After all of this though, we decide whether Raw is shelve-able, or if it is simply scrap-able.

So, how do you like your meal? Well done or still bleeding? Tune in and then let us know!

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If you haven’t yet, you can connect with us through our various means of social media. Also, it would mean a lot if you left a review on iTunes after you finish subscribing.

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GTGC #237 Saw

October 14th, 2017

Your favorite film analysis podcast continues the 6th annual Shocktober marathon with James Wan's breakout hit, Saw. 

We Play a Game with Saw

In 2004, James Wan hit with a bang. The director worked with Leigh Whannell to put together one of the most important horror movies of the 2000s. With Saw as a diving board, James Wan has gone on to greater depths than anyone could have imagined—Insidious, The Conjuring, Fast 7 and the upcoming Aquaman. But, does Saw itself stand the test of time?

Saw tells the story of Adam (Whannell) and Dr. Gordon (Elwes), the latest captors of the Jigsaw Killer (Bell). The men wake in a room, tethered to the wall. Over the course of the narrative, they must work together to uncover their connection and figure out if they can win Jigsaw's game.

For better or for worse, Saw is one of the most successful and influential horror franchises of all time. Spawning seven sequels, with the 8th entry (Jigsaw) on the way, it reframed audience expectations for horror franchises. On this week's show, the gang discuss the history and importance of the Saw franchise. The questions of Jigsaw's motives also come up, as well as a discussion of the film as a cultural reaction to the rise of public awareness to torture in American military tactics.

We also discuss our Favorite Resilient Prisoners and Captives in the game, and of course we render the verdict. Is this movie worthy of the shelf? Or, is it simply trash.

Listen now or not—the choice is yours.

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